Max out your Dropbox referrals for $5

Max out your Dropbox referrals for $5

Dropbox will give you up to 16GB of extra storage for life in exchange for referring people to Dropbox (500MB per person). If you are like me, you don’t know 32 people that: A) don’t have Dropbox, and B) want to signup for Dropbox. The solution? Use Fiverr!

I’m a huge fan of Fiverr. For $5-$20 you can get all sorts of menial tasks done, videos or graphics created, videos transcribed, etc. You can also, for just $5, get ALL of your Dropbox referrals in just an hour or two with no effort on your part. I’m lazy so that last bit is very important to me. Just click here, pay the $5, give the guy your referral link, and that is it! In a few hours you’ll have the maximum amount of credit available for referring people to Dropbox.

Click here to get up to 16GB of extra Dropbox storage for life for just $5. There are other sellers on Fiverr that do the same thing. I’ve only used this guy though so I can’t vouch for the other sellers.

Read More

Googlefest 2014

Googlefest 2014

Yesterday I got to go to Googlefest 2014 in Charleston SC with my dad and my brother. It was a lot of fun. We took some photos with a six foot Android mascot. I also got to try out Google Glass. It was neat, but definitely not worth the current $1500 price tag.

Android and Me

It was a short event but I learned some useful things.

One of the speakers talked about Gen C (pretty much matched the info on this page). This group of individuals is defined by their mindset rather than their age. Marketing to Gen C is much different than marketing to other generation groups. They care more about the opinions of their peers, are more mobile, and love video. The presentation gave some good pointers on getting started with marketing to this group.

Another speaker went over Google Analytics. In addition to some tips and tricks I wasn’t aware of, she pointed us to the Google Analytics Academy. This site provides free analytics training provided by Google. I’ve gone through most of the first course and have learned a ton. I’ve always had Google Analytics on my sites, but turns out it is so much more powerful than I thought.

We also grabbed a pile of goodies: Moleskine-style notebooks, pens, mechanical pencils, tote bags, magnet words, and some sort of weird elastic thing with Google printed on it. Not sure what the elastic thing is supposed to be. My mom thinks it is a hair tie but that seems like a weird giveaway.

Goodies

The most interesting, albeit least useful to me, portion of the conference focused on emergency management. The South Carolina Emergency Management Division spoke on how they use Google’s tools and products to help them do their jobs. For example, they have Google Earth configured to show storm surge, hurricane evacuation routes, earthquake fault lines, and epicenters of previous earthquakes. They also use social media to get live feedback from average people during emergencies. This allows them to find problems before they are officially reported, or to determine if an emergency is actually happening (e.g., was that tremor felt all over or just in this building?).

love short conferences like this. They are fun to attend and provide condensed doses of useful information. Thanks Google!

Read More

Bitcoin Faucets

Bitcoin Faucets

Need something to do while you are sick in bed? How about getting some free Bitcoins?

A Bitcoin faucet is a service that gives out tiny tiny bits of Bitcoins for free, typically 50 to 1000 satoshi at a time. A satoshi is 0.00000001 BTC, or about $0.000006557 USD (at the moment.. prices are always fluctuating), so it really isn’t much money. The owners of these services earn money by selling ad space.

To keep you from racking up the Bitcoins too fast, these services only let you earn satoshi once every 30 minutes to 24 hours.

You need at least 5500 satoshi to get paid due to Bitcoin minimum transaction size requirements, and some services require a little bit more just to make it harder to get a payout. Many faucets send micropayments to an aggregator, which then pays you when you get 5500 satoshi.

So here are a few of my favorites (some of these give me a referral bonus.. using these links won’t reduce the amount of Bitcoins you’ll get though..):

Bitcoin Zebra – If you are only going to try this once, then Bitcoin Zebra is the one to use. It lets you earn once every hour and has a Chrome extension that gives you a heads up when it is time to earn some more. They only pay out once a week, but you’ll earn more for doing less than you would with other faucets.

Bit Chest – This aggregator uses many faucets, including 8coin which gives 500 satoshi at a time. I really like this one because: A) it lets you know when you can earn more satoshi, B) it is easy to get to 5500 satoshi in a single day, and C) it pays out each night.

CoinBox.me – They have a bunch of little faucets that get aggregated into this one site. They have a full list of faucets on their homepage. They pay out daily, but it takes a LOT more work to get to the minimum 5500 payout because their faucets don’t give out much at a time.

There are PILES of faucets out there, but these are the best I’ve seen (particularly the first two).

Read More

2012 Survey of Business Owners

2012 Survey of Business Owners

I got an unusual letter in the mail today (personally identifying parts have been blurred out):

census

Basically it says I reported business activity in 2012 and they want me to take a survey about my business. According to the document, my participation is “MANDATORY“.

In case you are curious, the survey wasn’t very exciting. It asked me to confirm my contact information and provide a telephone number, how many people owned my business in 2012, and my ownership percentage and title.

For each owner (for me, just myself), it asked for gender, if I’m of Hispanic/Latino/Spanish origin,  my race, and whether I’ve served in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Next, it asked if two or more members of one family owned the majority of the business. Sort of a silly question, since I already told them (twice) that I was the sole owner. Last, it had a blank field where I could put any notes to help explain my answers to the survey.

That’s it. Took maybe 2 minutes to fill out. Not very exciting, and provides the Census Bureau with a lot less information than I would have expected, especially considering the cost involved in doing one of these surveys.

Read More